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Association of Ukrainians In Great Britain Ltd (Huddersfield Branch)

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  1. In 1946, at the end of the Second World War, Ukrainian ex-patriots within Great Britain founded the Association of Ukrainians in Great Britain ('the Association'). The Association was founded to promote and support the interests of the Ukrainian Community within the UK and is currently the largest representative body for Ukrainians and these of Ukrainian descent.

    Huddersfield Ukrainian Social Club ''Kalyna'' was a result of the dedication of these Ukrainian ex-patriots in maintaining the life and interests of the Ukrainian community of Huddersfield.



Contacts

John Kybaluk
Chairman

The Ukrainian Club , 7 Edgerton Road, Edgerton, Huddersfield HD1 5RA

Maria Ptycia
Bookings
07581 383634
Michael Semenczuk
Vice Chairman

7 Edgerton Road, Edgerton, Huddersfield HD1 5RA


Organisation last updated

  1. 25 November 2019

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Venue

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  1. The Ukrainian Club, 7, Edgerton Road, Edgerton, Huddersfield, HD1 5RA
    1. Wheelchair access needs to be arranged in advance -  please contact the venue for further details. Wheelchair access - by arrangement
    2. There is a toilet which can be accessed by people with disabilities including wheelchair users. This means that it complies with the standards set out in Part M of the Building Regulations,'Access to and use of buildings. Fully accessible toilet

History

  1. In 1946, at the end of the Second World War, Ukrainian ex-patriot's within Great Britain founded the Association of Ukrainians in Great Britain ('the Association').

    The Association was founded to promote and support the interests of the Ukrainian Community within the UK and is currently the largest representative body for Ukrainians and those of Ukrainian descent.

    The Huddersfield Branch of the Association formed in 1947, meeting initially at Lindley Liberal Club. It is estimated that there were 250 Ukrainian exiles in Huddersfield, many exiled not only from their oppressed homeland, but also from their families, yet they chose to sacrifice in order to live in a free country.

    In 1956, the Association, now with approximately 170 members purchased their first premises within Huddersfield, a large house in Trinity Street.

    The Association was not just a social organisation, but also ''a registered mutual aid and benefits organisation for all Ukrainians in Great Britain based on self-reliance and fraternal co-operation.'

    As well as the Association, several other organisations also met at the Trinity street house, this included the Association of Ukrainian Youth (an equivalent to Boy Scouts) and an ex-soldiers club as well as the Association of Ukrainian Women. There was also a Saturday afternoon school, at which children were instructed in the Ukrainian language, literature, history and geography, although the children knew nothing but English culture.

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